Saturday, October 21

OVERVIEW

Coffee (8:00-8:30)  
This coffee break is sponsored by the Colorado State University English Department.

Session E Concurrent Panels  (8:30-9:45)
10 concurrent panels

Session F Concurrent Panels  (10:00-11:15)
10 concurrent panels

Awards Lunch and Keynote Address  (11:15-12:45)
Keynote Address: Ellen Cushman
“Place and Relationships in Community Writing”

Award for Outstanding College/Community Project in Community Writing  (presented by Allen Brizee)
Award for Outstanding Book in Community Writing  (presented by Beverly Moss)
Award for Distinguished Engaged Scholar in Community Writing  (presented by Eli Goldblatt)

Session G Concurrent Panels   (1:00-2:15)
10 concurrent panels

Session H Concurrent Panels  (2:30-3:45)
10 concurrent panels

Coffee and Snack Break    (3:45-4:00)

Full Conference Reflective Discussion and Action Steps through IMPROV PERFORMANCE
(4:00-5:30)
Facilitated by Playback Theater West

FULL SCHEDULE

 

SESSION E CONCURRENT PANELS   (8:30-9:45)

E1.  Resilient, Community Engaged, and at Maximum Capacity: Doing More With a Network
Chair: Sarah Stanley, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Suzanne Bishop, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Chanelle Fournier, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Jennifer Tilbury, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Kendell Newman Sadiik, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Jody Hassel, Blossom House
Sarah Stanley, University of Alaska Fairbanks

E2.  Civic Engagement and Composition: Inquiry around Freedom, History, & Politics in our Current Democracy
Chair: Michelle Baptiste, University of California, Berkeley
Amy Jamgochian, Prison University Project, San Quentin State Prison, “Practices of
Enfranchisement: Lessons from the Prison University Project at San Quentin State Prison”
Grace Morizawa, Education Coordinator, National Japanese American Historical Society, In collaboration with: Bay Area Writing Project & the National Park Service
“From Tule Lake to the Classroom:  What Is Loyalty in a Japanese American Concentration Camp?”
Michelle Baptiste, University of California, Berkeley “Engaging in Democracy: Political Discourse Analysis in a University Classroom”

E3.  Drawing from History to Engage in the Present
Chair: Alice Horning, Oakland University
Phyllis Mentzell Ryder, The George Washington University, “#Black Lives Matter, Civil Disobedience, and the Networked Protest Model”
Connie Snyder Mick, University of Notre Dame, “A Community Writing Approach to Wicked Problems: Lessons from Poverty Studies”
Alice Horning, Oakland University, “Community-Based Literacy Then and Now: Lessons from the Past”

E4.  Ethics, Narrative, and Ethnographic Research Methods in Community-Based, Online Health Research
Chair: Lori Beth De Hertogh, James Madison University
Lori Beth De Hertogh, James Madison University, “Feminist Digital Research Methodology for Rhetoricians of Health and Medicine”
Lindsey Macdonald, Purdue University, “Cyber-Ethnographic Research Methods for Online Health Research”
Katrina Hinson, Tarleton State University, “Networked Narratives: Illness Related Facebook Support Groups”

E5.  Community Writing Centers
Chair: Philip Bode, North Dakota State University
Philip Bode, North Dakota State University, “‘The World at Large’: Expanding Writing Centers into Marginalized Community Spaces”
Chessie Alberti, Oregon State University, “Doing It in Public: Community Writing Centers as Empowering Publics”
Mark Latta, Marian University, “Critical Collaborations: Advocacy and Public Literacies in Imagining a Community Writing Center”  
Helen Raica-Klotz and Chris Giroux, Saginaw Valley State University, “Locally Grown, Locally Produced: The Farmers’ Market Model of a Community Writing Center”

E6.  ROUNDTABLE: Expanding Literacy Networks and Ecologies through a Community Press
Chair: Christopher Wilkey, Northern Kentucky University
Christopher Wilkey, Northern Kentucky University
Brian Bailie, University of Cincinnati, Blue Ash College
Alice Skirtz, Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition
Jennifer Arens, Peaslee Neighborhood Center

E7.  Students Involved in Sustaining Their Arkansas (SISTA): Collaborative Writing to Revitalize Economically Struggling Communities
Chair: David Jolliffe, University of Arkansas
David Jolliffe, University of Arkansas, “SISTA:  An Antidote to Excessive Nostalgia in a Community Writing Project”
Julia Paganelli-Marin, University of Arkansas, “SISTA as a Bridge from Community to Academic Writing”
Jonathan Green, University of Arkansas, “The Tricky Business of Sustainable Funding in a Community Writing Project”

E8.  Access to/through Writing
Chair: Glenn Hutchinson, Florida International University
Glenn Hutchinson, Florida International University, “Networks of Action: Undocumented Students and the Writing Classroom”
Isabel Baca, University of Texas at El Paso, “Leveraging Linguistic Networks to Promote Community Action on the Borderlands”
Alyssa Cavazos, Norma D. Dibrell, and Judith N. Ramirez, The University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley, “Exploring Linguistic Access in a Border Community: Experiences of Faculty, Students, and Community Stakeholders”

E9.  Constructing Digital and Material Networks in Community-Based Composition Studies
Chair: Robin Wharton, Georgia State University
Robin Wharton, Georgia State University, “Place-Based Pedagogy: Locating Composition Within the Atlanta Studies Network”
Ashley J. Holmes, Georgia State University, “Place-Based Mobile Composition: Grounding Digital Writing in Local Community”
Jessica Estep, Georgia Gwinnett College, “Expanding Community Ecosystems by Examining the Material Space of the Street”

E10. Meeting of the Community Literacy Journal staff

SESSION F CONCURRENT PANELS   (10:00-11:15)

F1. Mapping the Entanglements of Community Spaces
Chair: Cynthia Fields, Augusta University
Kristen Seas Trader, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, “Rhetorical Contagion and the Mimetic Entanglements of Community”
Cynthia Fields, Augusta University, “Re-writing Spaces for Social Action: The Limits of Ecology and the Affordances of Spatial Justice”
Nicole C. Cunningham-Frisbey, University of New Hampshire, “Mapping Thirdspace Writing in Communities”

F2.  Life Sentences: Citizenship and Composition in Liminal Ecologies
Chair: Emily Artiano, University of Southern California
Emily Artiano, University of Southern California, “Writing in the Expansive Ecology of Dehumanization”
Ben Pack, University of Southern California, “Taking on Transition: Pedagogical and Personal Shifts in the Workshop Over Time”
John Murray, University of Southern California, “Memoir as a Tool for Negotiating Conflicting Identities”
Stephanie Bower, University of Southern California, “Sitting on the Porch or at the Table: Complicity and Resistance in the Writing Workshop”

F3.  ROUNDTABLE: Service-Learning, Civic Engagement, and Black Subjectivities: The Literacy Narratives of Black Columbus
Chair: Sara Wilder, University of Maryland, College Park
Beverly J. Moss, The Ohio State University
Sherita V. Roundtree, The Ohio State University
Gavin P. Johnson, The Ohio State University
Michael Blancato, The Ohio State University
Sara Wilder, University of Maryland, College Park

F4.  Engaging Students Through Ethical Inquiry
Chair: Teri Crisp, University of California Berkeley
Teri Crisp, University of California Berkeley, “Ecological Ethics: Sources of Inspiration”
Michelle Baptiste, University of California Berkeley, “Education in Action: Environmental Field Studies”
Donnett Flash, University of California Berkeley, “Ordinary Conversations as Site for Analyzing Ethics”

F5.  Digital Circulation and Community Writing: Expert, Novice, and WPA Network Theory
Chair: James Donelan, University of California Santa Barbara
James Donelan, University of California Santa Barbara
Christopher Dean, University of California Santa Barbara
Kathy Patterson, University of California Santa Barbara

F6.  Fostering Ecological Relationships: A Rhizomatic Snapshot of Local Language, Literacy, and Writing Needs at Cal State Los Angeles
Chair: Kathryn Perry, California State University Los Angeles
Kathryn Perry, California State University Los Angeles
Aaron Sonnenschein, California State University Los Angeles
Nora Cisneros, California State University Los Angeles

F7.  Community Literacy in the Age of Big Data: An Advocacy Strategy
Chair: Linda Adler-Kassner, University of California Santa Barbara
Linda Adler-Kassner, University of California Santa Barbara
Heidi Estrem, Boise State University
Dawn Shepherd, Boise State University
Susan Miller-Cochran, University of Arizona

F8.  Challenges and Opportunities: Crafting Infrastructures for University and Public Work
Chair: Lara Smith-Sitton, Kennesaw State University
Don Unger, St. Edward’s University, “Building University Infrastructure for Service and Engagement throughNetwork* Writing”
Christina Santana, Worcester State University, “For Us, Them, and Our Students: Growing an Interdisciplinary Ecology through a Writing Liaison Program”
Lara Smith-Sitton, Kennesaw State University, “Programmatic Concerns: Identifying Partners and Creating Infrastructures for Community-Based Projects”
Megan Faver Hartline, Trinity College, “Developing Transdisciplinary Networks for Community-Engaged Research”

F9.  Show Some Skin: Live, Remixed, and Flexible Rhetorics for Social Change
Chair: Cecilia Lucero, University of Notre Dame
Nicole MacLaughlin, University of Notre Dame
Cecilia Lucero, University of Notre Dame
Patrick Clauss, University of Notre Dame

F10.  Technical, Science, and Business Communication
Chair: Seán McCarthy, James Madison University
Seán McCarthy, James Madison University, “Blurred Lines: Community Writing and Its Relation to Social Innovation in Higher Education”
Lenny Grant, Syracuse University, and Cassandra Hockman, Virginia Tech, “The Teacher-Student-Practitioner Network: Authentic Learning in an Intra-Institutional Science Writing Collaboration”
Seth Myers, University of Colorado Boulder, “Hacking community: Social science methodology applied in digital communities”

AWARDS LUNCH and KEYNOTE ADDRESS (11:15-12:45)

Keynote: Ellen Cushman
“Place and Relationships in Community Writing”
The Cherokee word for school, ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ (dideloquasdi), roughly translates to ‘the place where they learn.’ It illustrates two concepts key to the learning that unfolds in community writing projects: place and relationships. In this address, I’ll draw on a number of Cherokee precepts that help us understand how place and relationships factor centrally into community writing projects. Community writing as a discipline pays particularly close attention to relationships and place, or networks and ecologies, in efforts designed to help communities and students write themselves together. Where we learn together, I’ll argue, we create peoplehood and perseverance.

Award for Outstanding College/Community Project in Community Writing  (presented by Allen Brizee)
Award for Outstanding Book in Community Writing  (presented by Beverly Moss)
Award for Distinguished Engaged Scholar in Community Writing  (presented by Eli Goldblatt)

SESSION G CONCURRENT PANELS  (1:00-2:15)

G1.  The Idea of a Writer’s House: Realizing Civic Engagement on Cooper Street in Camden
Chair: Bill FitzGerald, Rutgers University—Camden
Bill FitzGerald, Rutgers University—Camden
Leah Falk, Rutgers University—Camden

G2.  Ecologies of the Borderlands Studies Digital Archive Project: Using Digital Humanities to “Write” Histories with Greater Complexity
Chair: Regina McManigell Grijalva, Oklahoma City University
Regina McManigell Grijalva, Oklahoma City University
Mark Griffin, Oklahoma City University
Joy Pendley, University of Oklahoma

G3.  Politics, “Truth,” and Assessments Emerging in Service-Learning Composition Courses
Chair: Tara Lockhart, San Francisco State University
Anita Cabrera, San Francisco State University, “The Space and Place of Now: Community Writing in a Sanctuary City”
Jerome Schwab, San Francisco State University, “Birth of a Notion: Politics are Personal”
Amy Latham, San Francisco State University, “An Ecology of “Alternative Facts”; Teaching Truth in an Age of Misinformation”
Emma Rogers, San Francisco State University and Tara Lockhart, San Francisco State
University, “Ecological Assignments: Using Student Feedback to Prompt Change”

G4.  Sustaining Performative Interventions in Academic Labor: Theory, Institution, Activism
Chair: Sarah Austin, United States Air Force Academy Prep School
Lydia Page, “Frankly, Scarlet, I don’t give a damn!”
Sue Doe, Colorado State University, “Updating Campus Activism for Broad Purposes”
Sarah Austin, United States Air Force Academy Prep School, “Adjunct Activism – Enacting Tangible Changes in Curricula, Campus Activities and Human Resources”
Vani Kannan, Syracuse University, “Academic Labor as Embodied Performance: Popular Theater as a Coalitional Pedagogy”

G5.  ROUNDTABLE: Self-Publication and Community Writing
Chair: Steve Parks, Syracuse University
Eli Goldblatt, Temple University, “The Legacy of Hal Adams: Journal of Ordinary Thought and Real Connections
Tobi Jacobi, Colorado State University, and Mary Ellen Sanger, Colorado State University, “SpeakOut! Writers on Self-Publication: Reflections from Community Writing”
Michelle Curry, Colorado State University, “Dignifying Quieted Voices: The Role of Self-Publication in Community Writing”
Paula Mathieu, Boston College, “The Question of Sustainability and Self-Publishing: Street Papers and the Challenge of the Long Haul”
Steve Parks, Syracuse University, “Learning from the Past: The Federation of Worker Writers and Community Publishers Archive”

G6.  Environmental Communication and Social Action
Chair: Daniel Wuebben, University of Nebraska Omaha
Alison Singer, Michigan State University, “Translating Community Narratives into Semi-Quantitative Models to Understand the Dynamics of Socio-environmental Crises”
Daniel Wuebben, University of Nebraska Omaha, “Writing to Reroute Power Lines, or, “You Think Rhetoric’s Gonna Keep That Crap Off My Land?!”
Analisa Skeen, Michigan State University, “Wilderness Regulations and Decolonial Possibility in the National Park Service”
Cassandra Hockman, Virginia Tech, “’Science gave me voice’: Citizen Scientists, Writing, and Community in the Virginia Tech-Flint, Michigan Collaboration”

G7.  Food Literacies
Chair: Steven Alvarez, St. John’s University
Steven Alvarez, St. John’s University, “Taco Literacies: Mexican Foodways Writing in the Bluegrass”
Constance Gordon, University of Colorado Boulder, “Community Food Justice: Re-Defining Food ‘Deserts’ from the Ground Up”
Molly Kugel-Merkner, University of Denver, “Emily Dickinson’s Botanical Legacy, Community Gardens, and Poetic Pedagogy”
Tara E. Friedman, Widener University, and Patricia M. Dyer, Widener University, “Generating Powerful Voices: ‘Farming’ Local Change and Sustainability Through Writing”

G8.  Poetry Outreach for Veterans, Prisoners, and Students: Creating a Responsive Flow Infrastructure from the Inside Out
Chair: Laurie Cella, Shippensburg University
Laurie Cella, Shippensburg University
Nicole Santalucia, Shippensburg University
Abby Murray, University of Washington

G9.  Networked Literacy
Chair: Jennifer M. Cunningham, Kent State University at Stark
Sarah Puett, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, ““Counterpublic Community Literacy: A Look at Local Resistance.”
Joe Concannon, The University of Washington Seattle, “Šǝqačib: Networking Memory, Native Identity, and Community Partnership”
Amy McCleese Nichols, University of Louisville, “Mapping Literacy Infrastructure: Networked Sponsorship in a Rural Community”
Jennifer M. Cunningham, Kent State University at Stark, “The Ecologically Interdependent Nature of Digital African American Language”

G10.  Building Community Partnerships to Achieve Transformational and Lifelong Learning
Chair: Melinda Knight, Montclair State University
Melinda Knight, Montclair State University
Alice Beresin and Alicia Remolde, Montclair State University
Melinda Knight, Montclair State University
Laura Lubrano, Montclair State University

SESSION H CONCURRENT PANELS  (2:30-3:45)

H1.  “‘What Is To Be Done?’: A Writing Democracy Workshop” (workshop description #11)
Deborah Mutnick, Long Island University, Brooklyn, “Can It Get Any Worse? Neoliberal Education in the Trump Era”
John Duffy, Notre Dame University, “‘Ironic Points of Light’: Professor Watchlist, ‘Post-Truth,’ and the First-Year Writing Class”
Carmen Kynard, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, “‘Free To … Be Black as Hell’: Race-Radical Literacies, College Classrooms, and the ‘Changing Same’ of White Supremacy”
Shannon Carter,Texas A&M-Commerce,  “From ‘Writing Democracy’: The Post-Trump Story Circle”

H2.  Cultivating Ecologies of Transgressive Community Literacy Through Engaged Practicum Experiences
Chair: Lori Bable, University of Arizona
Sally Benson, University of Arizona, “Evolution of an Unlikely Writers’ Group”
Rachel Buck, University of Arizona, “Emotional Costs and Reciprocal Care in Community Literacy Work”
Lori Bable, University of Arizona, “Cultivating Vital Community Literacies with Radical Relationality”

H3.  Microbial Lessons Toward a Trophic Model of Community
Chair: Jeremiah Dyehouse, University of Rhode Island
Caroline Gottschalk Druschke, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Lily Lewis, University of Florida, “Community Building in Extreme Environments: Lessons from Sphagnum Moss Microbiome”
Jodie Nicotra, University of Idaho, “Imperfect Community Is All You Get: Counterlessons from the Human Food Project”
Jeremiah Dyehouse, University of Rhode Island, “Barnyard Sensations: What Rind-washed Cheeses Can Teach Us About Trophic Models of Community”

H4.  It Takes A Village to Raise a Children’s Book
Chair: Danny Long, University of Colorado Boulder
Danny Long, University of Colorado Boulder
Barbara Losoff, University of Colorado
Deborah Hollis, University of Colorado
Stephanie Briggs, Bear Creek Elementary School

H5.  The Potentials of Identity Expression in Digital Ecologies: Exploring Performance and Representation in Facebook, Fanfiction, and Avatars
Facilitator: Ellen Cushman, Northeastern University
Cara Messina, Northeastern University
Matthew Hitchcock, Northeastern University
Sandra Nelson, The University of Pittsburgh (paper read by Cara Messina)

H6.  Post Truth, Fake News, and Information Literacy
Chair: Rolf Norgaard, University of Colorado Boulder
Desiree Dighton, North Carolina State University, “Critical Literacy: Social Networks and the Rhetoric of Protest”
Rolf Norgaard, University of Colorado Boulder, “Information in a Post-Truth World: Impacts and Opportunities for Community Writing and Information Literacy Education”
Caroline Sinkinson, University of Colorado Boulder, “Information in a Post-Truth World: Impacts and Opportunities for Community Writing and Information Literacy Education”

H7.  Mapping Assets, Data Visualization, and Assessment
Chair: Lev Szentkiralyi, University of Colorado Boulder
Heather Noel Turner, Michigan State University, “Practices, Approaches, and Commitments for Culturally Inclusive Community Work”
Karen Rowan, California State University – San Bernardino, “Towards a Center for Community Writing: An Asset-Based Case Study of San Bernardino’s Community Cultural Wealth”
Alexandra Cavallaro, California State University – San Bernardino, “Towards a Center for Community Writing: An Asset-Based Case Study of San Bernardino’s Community Cultural Wealth”
Lev Szentkiralyi, University of Colorado Boulder, “How Writing Instruction Improves the Service-Learning Experience: An Empirical Test”

H8.  Building Networks with Vets and Homeless
Chair: Lauren Rosenberg, New Mexico State University
Lauren Rosenberg, New Mexico State University, “What’s Community Got to Do with It? One Military Writer’s Reluctance to Identify as a Veteran”
Trinity Overmyer, Purdue University, “A Human Network, Materialized: Built Infrastructure and Rhetorical Force”
Mike Homner, Facing Homelessness, Boulder — Chief Story Teller, “Stories of the Street”

H9.  Eco-Pedagogy
Chair: Doug Dupler, University of Colorado Boulder
Doug Dupler, University of Colorado Boulder, “Rhetoric and Sustainability: Context and Approaches”
Megan Kelly, University of Denver, “Lessons from the ‘Campaign Toolbox’: What We Can Learn about Composition from Student Activist Organizations”
Robert Eric Shoemaker, Naropa University, Sarah Escue, Naropa University, and Emily Duffy, Naropa University, “Redefining Eco-Pedagogy for Community Praxis” (30 min)

H10.  Public Writing Pedagogy
Chair: Tyler Branson, University of Toledo
Tyler Branson, University of Toledo, “Public Ecologies: A Micro Case Study of Public Writing Pedagogy”
Brenda Glascott, Portland State University, “Lessons From the Micropublic: Activist Rhetorics and the Teaching of Writing”
Darrel Elmore, Florida International University, “Virtual Village: Community Engagement in the Online Classroom”

Coffee and Snack Break(3:45-4:00)

“Why We Strive”

Interactive Closing Improv Performance, with Playback Theatre West
Saturday, October 21, 4:00-5:30
Playback Theatre is founded upon the idea that stories shape our lives and build community. For nearly 30 years, the professional actors and musicians of Playback Theatre West have used this form to facilitate both personal and community sharing, healing, and growth. Audience members share a story from their lives and professional improvisers turn them into art, on the spot.
This unique and interactive not-to-be-missed closing event will allow us to bring together participants from across the conference, to explore shared themes and forge connections between our work, our current/future challenges, and our shared visions.  Playback’s fluidly dynamic, embodied forms invite us to visualize more clearly the ways in which the dynamics behind our conference themes write themselves upon the world and affect us as whole persons and interrelating communities.
In this facilitated closing plenary, conference participants will be invited to share moments or insights from the conference, our lives, and our individual and collective work – which will be “translated” into professional theater, movement, and song, in the moment and on the spot.